BLACK WITH NO CHASER

Black in the Day…W.E.B Dubois and The Souls of Black Folks

August 27, 1963:

Black in the Day

Today we commemorate the death and celebrate the life and accomplishments of W.E.B. Dubois…

W.E.B. Du Bois, in full William Edward Burghardt Du Bois, (born February 23, 1868, Great BarringtonMassachusetts, U.S.—died August 27, 1963, Accra, Ghana), American sociologist, historian, author, editor, and activist who was the most important black protest leader in the United States during the first half of the 20th century. He shared in the creation of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP)in 1909 and edited The Crisis, its magazine, from 1910 to 1934. His collection of essays The Souls of Black Folk (1903) is a landmark of African American literature.  The scholar and activist W.E.B. Du Bois became the first African American to earn a Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1895. He wrote extensively and was the best-known spokesperson for African-American rights during the first half of the 20th century.

 

“The problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line.” –W.E.B Dubois
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