Black in the Day…The Wizard of Tuskegee

November 14, 1915: On this day educator, author, orator, and advisor Booker T. Washington passed away from complications of hugh blood pressure.   Booker Taliaferro Washington (April 5, 1856[1] – November 14, 1915) was an American educator, author, orator, and advisor to multiple presidents of the United States. Between 1890 and 1915, Washington was the dominant leader in the African-American community known as a Black elite. Washington was from the last generation of black American leaders born into slavery and became the leading voice of the former slaves and their descendants. They were newly oppressed…

Black in the Day…Scholarship, Sisterhood and Service

November 12, 1922: On this day the Sigma Gamma Rho sorority was founded at Butler University in Indianapolis, Indiana by seven young educators. Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc. (ΣΓΡ) was founded on November 12, 1922, at Butler University in Indianapolis, Indiana by seven young educators. It was incorporated within the state of Indiana in December 1922 and became a national collegiate sorority on December 30, 1929, when a charter was granted to the Alpha chapter. The sorority is a non-profit whose aim is to enhance the quality of life within the community. Public service, leadership development and the education of youth are the…

Black in the Day…The End of Nat’s Rebellion

November 11, 1831: On this day Nat Turner was hanged in Jerusalem, Virginia. His body was flayed and beheaded as an example to frighten other would-be rebels. Nat Turner (October 2, 1800 – November 11, 1831) was an enslaved African-American preacher who led a two-day rebellion of both enslaved and free black people in Southampton County, Virginia, beginning August 21, 1831. The rebellion caused the death of approximately 60 white men, women and children. Whites organized militias and called out regular troops to suppress the uprising. In addition, white militias and mobs attacked blacks in the area, killing an estimated 120 men, women and…

Black in the Day…The Godfather of Golf

November 10, 1957: On this day Charlie Sifford wins the Long Beach Open becoming the first Black man to win a major professional golf tournament. Sifford was born in Charlotte, North Carolina, in 1922.[2] He began work as a caddy at the age of thirteen.[3] He moved to Philadelphia when he was 17 years old, where he played against local black golfers.[4] Sifford began golfing professionally in 1948.[5] He competed in the golf tournaments that black golfers organized for themselves as they were excluded from the Professional Golfers’ Association of America (PGA). Sifford won the United Golf Association‘s National…

Black in the Day…A Man Ahead of His Time

November 9, 1731: On this day the greatest minds ever was born. Almanac author, inventor, surveyor , naturalist and farmer; Benjamin Banneker was born as a free African American in Baltimore County, Province of Maryland, British America.   Benjamin Banneker was born on November 9, 1731, in Baltimore County, Maryland to Mary Banneky, a free black, and Robert, a freed slave from Guinea.[2][3][4][5] There are two conflicting accounts of Banneker’s family history. Banneker himself and his earliest biographers described him as having only African ancestry.[6][7][8] None of Banneker’s surviving papers describe a white ancestor or…