Black in the Day…On the Brain

October 22, 1953: On this day Dr. Clarence Greene became the first Black person to be certified by the American Board of Neurological Surgery. Largely because of the advances of the Civil Rights movement in the mid-20th century, an increasing number of African-Americans have had the opportunity to become physicians and enter the distinguished field of neurosurgery. Many have made the most of this opportunity, becoming prominent in both academics and private practice. Unfortunately, the details regarding the first African-American neurosurgeon, Clarence Sumner Greene, Sr., have remained in relative obscurity.…

Black in the Day…A Million Strong

October 16, 1995: On this day a million Black men and children converged on DC. The Million Man March was a large gathering of African-American men in Washington, D.C., on October 16, 1995 held on and around the National Mall.  This assembly of black men was organized and hosted by the Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan who called for all able-bodied African American men to come to the nation’s capital to address the ills of black communities and call for unity and revitalization of African American communities.  Although the Million Man March was proposed and organized primarily by…

On September 11th Marcy’s Black Life Mattered

Today marks the 18th anniversary of the September 11th World Trade Center attacks. For many this is not only a day of mourning but a day of remembrance for the first responders, victims, and survivors on that terrifying day. Eighteen years later we have continued to witness the anguish, pain, and suffering in the aftermath of 9/11 admidst war, religious bigotry, and Americanism on full display in a manner that has set us too far back. The many faces of September 11th remain etched in stone but one survivor’s story…

Black in the Day…Changing the Face of Medicine

September 7, 1993: On this day Dr. Jocelyn Elders changed the face of Medicine in America. Joycelyn Elders, the first person in the state of Arkansas to become board certified in pediatric endocrinology, was the fifteenth Surgeon General of the United States, the first African American and only the second woman to head the U.S. Public Health Service. Long an outspoken advocate of public health, Elders was appointed Surgeon General by President Clinton on September 7, 1993. Elders was born Minnie Lee Jones in Schaal, Arkansas,[2] to a poor farm sharecropping family, and was the eldest…