UPDATE Coronavirus COVID-19 : All 50 States Have Reported Cases

What is COVID-19? In COVID-19, ‘CO’ stands for ‘corona,’ ‘VI’ for ‘virus,’ and ‘D’ for disease. Formerly, this disease was referred to as “2019 novel coronavirus” or “2019-nCoV.” A novel coronavirus is a new coronavirus that has not been previously identified. The virus causing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), is not the same as the coronaviruses that commonly circulate among humans and cause mild illness, like the common cold. Click here for an explanation on how it spreads and how it differs from a common cold or the flu. UPDATE March 20, 2020…

On their 15th Anniversary, FAMU Deltas Honor The Memory of Their Beloved Linesister in an Incredibly Touching Tribute

The image came across my timeline, a photograph of a group of beautiful black women somewhere in what appeared to be a desert all dressed in white with camels both kneeling and standing around them. There was an undeniable regalness to the image – I was in the presence of black royalty. At first glance, I thought that I had seen an image like this many times before– of beautiful black professional millennial women gathering together abroad to celebrate life; but, the more I observed the picture the more something…

Black Greeks on a Mission to Save the Detroit Honey Bee Population by Turning Vacant Lots Into Urban Bee Farms.

Pollination is the transfer of pollen from a male part of a plant to a female part of a plant, later enabling fertilization and the production of seeds, most often by an animal or by wind. So how does pollen get from one flower to another? Well…flowers have to rely on vectors to move pollen. These vectors can include wind, water, birds, insects, butterflies, bats, and other animals that visit flowers. We call animals or insects that transfer pollen from plant to plant “pollinators”. Honey Bees Are Pollinators. Crop yield…

Black in the Day…On the Brain

October 22, 1953: On this day Dr. Clarence Greene became the first Black person to be certified by the American Board of Neurological Surgery. Largely because of the advances of the Civil Rights movement in the mid-20th century, an increasing number of African-Americans have had the opportunity to become physicians and enter the distinguished field of neurosurgery. Many have made the most of this opportunity, becoming prominent in both academics and private practice. Unfortunately, the details regarding the first African-American neurosurgeon, Clarence Sumner Greene, Sr., have remained in relative obscurity.…