Black in the Day…The Wizard of Tuskegee

November 14, 1915: On this day educator, author, orator, and advisor Booker T. Washington passed away from complications of hugh blood pressure.   Booker Taliaferro Washington (April 5, 1856[1] – November 14, 1915) was an American educator, author, orator, and advisor to multiple presidents of the United States. Between 1890 and 1915, Washington was the dominant leader in the African-American community known as a Black elite. Washington was from the last generation of black American leaders born into slavery and became the leading voice of the former slaves and their descendants. They were newly oppressed…

Black in the Day…A Senate First

November 8, 1966: On this day Edward W. Brooke became the first Black person elected to the United States Senate by popular vote. Edward William Brooke III was born on October 26, 1919, in Washington, D.C., to Edward William Brooke Jr. and Helen (Seldon) Brooke. He was the second of three children;[1] He was raised in a middle-class section of the city, and attended Dunbar High School, then one of the most prestigious academic high schools for African Americans.[2] After graduating in 1936, he enrolled in Howard University, where he first considered medicine, but ended…

Mississippi’s Absentee Ballot Process Creates a Financial Strain on Mississippi Voters – Especially Students

It was my second year of law school when I, like many of my colleagues, called my local circuit’s Clerk of Court’s office to request an absentee ballot. Mike Espy was running against Cindy Hyde Smith, and I decided I had to be a part of the opportunity to elect the second black US Senator in Mississippi History. Mike Espy ran with a goal of impacting the Mississippi economy, agriculture, education, and healthcare. I was sold as a voter, and very quickly requested my absentee ballot. Mike Espy being elected…

Black in the Day…Unbought and Unbossed

November 5, 1968:  On this day Shirley Chisholm became the first Black woman to be elected to Congress. Shirley Chisholm (born Shirley Anita St. Hill, November 30, 1924–January 1, 2005) was the first African-American woman ever elected to the U.S. Congress. She represented the 12th Congressional District of New York for seven terms (1968–1982) and quickly became known for her work on minority, women’s, and peace issues. Chisholm won election to the 91st Congress (1969–1971) running under the slogan “unbought and unbossed.” In 1968 she ran for the U.S. House of Representatives from New York’s 12th…

Colonel Jennifer Riley Collins Could Make History in Mississippi’s Attorney General Election on Tuesday November 5

She’s shorter than I remember, strolling in right on time for our interview. We pass pleasantries reflecting on the last time we saw each other. “It was outside the governors mansion right?” “Right”, she said. “It was at the Families Belong Together Rally.” After the scandal of the Trumps family separation policy became public, a group of outraged Mississippians gathered together to protest outside of the governors mansion. Jennifer Riley Collins, then Executive Director of the Mississippi ACLU, was on hand to make sure all rights were protected as Mississippians…