Black in the Day…In the Heart of the KKK

November 4, 1997: On this day Chuck E. Burris became the first Black mayor of Stone Mountain, Georgia. The town of Stone Mountain, Ga., holds the distinction of being the birthplace of the 20th Century revival of the Ku Klux Klan. The Dekalb County town and suburb of Atlanta also made history of another sort, when it elected its first African-American mayor on this day in 1997. The Ku Klux Klan proclaimed its 20th century rebirth on the granite mountain that gives the town its name. For decades white-hooded Klansmen flocked…

Black in the Day…A Million Strong

October 16, 1995: On this day a million Black men and children converged on DC. The Million Man March was a large gathering of African-American men in Washington, D.C., on October 16, 1995 held on and around the National Mall.  This assembly of black men was organized and hosted by the Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan who called for all able-bodied African American men to come to the nation’s capital to address the ills of black communities and call for unity and revitalization of African American communities.  Although the Million Man March was proposed and organized primarily by…

Black in the Day…An FTC First

September 26, 1962: On this day A. Leon Higginbotham, Jr., becomes the first African American member of the Federal Trade Commission.  In 1962 President Kennedy appointed Higginbotham to the Federal Trade Commission making him the youngest and first African American to ever serve on a federal regulatory commission. But this was not the only first that he accomplished. In 1964 Higginbotham was appointed the first African American Judge of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania by President Lyndon Johnson. By doing so, he became one of the youngest people…

Black in the Day…A Nobel Diplomat

September 22, 1950: On this day Ralph Bunche became the first Black person to win the Nobel Peace Prize for his mediation efforts in the Middle East. He was responsible for negotiating the 1949 Armistice Agreements between Israel and four Arab states. Bunche worked tirelessly for the United Nations for 25 mediating in other strife-torn regions, including the Congo, Yemen, Kashmir, and Cyprus. But he didn’t just serve other nations. He dutifully served his own nation and his own people. Throughout his life, Bunche worked to improve race relations and further the cause of civil rights. …